Frederick P. Zuspan, MD

Frederick P. Zuspan, MD

Frederick P. Zuspan, MD (June 7, 2009

Fredrick P. Zuspan M.D., distinguished leader, researcher and clinician in obstetrics and gynecology died peacefully at home on 7th June 2009. Fred grew up in a small town in central Ohio, Richwood, where he excelled in academics and sports. He entered Ohio State University determined to be an engineer but following World War II, where he was a Marine fighter pilot. He graduated from Ohio State University School of Medicine in 1951 , with honors. His obstetrics and gynecology training included three years at Ohio State and two years at Case Western Reserve. The next three years were spent working at a United Mine Workers Hospital in McDowell, Kentucky to repay loans incurred in training. Fred then returned to Case Western Reserve as an Oglebay Fellow where he developed a strong laboratory studying the metabolic aspects of preeclampsia. Within two years 75 he became Chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the The Medical College of Georgia. He remained in Georgia until 1966 when he became the Joseph Bolivar DeLee Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Chicago. In 1975 Fred’s alma mater called and he returned to Ohio State as Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology remaining there until he retired in 2001. Fred made many significant contributions to the specialty during his academic lifetime. He was proud of the many young people that he trained for both academic and practice careers. He gave generously of his time, training them in research, clinical medicine and most importantly how to be honest, empathetic and true physicians. Fred was one of the pioneers in the development of the sub specialty, Maternal Fetal Medicine. He was one of the originators of the journal Reproductive Medicine and served for over 30 years as an editor of AJOG where he worked tirelessly to make a better journal for its readers. Fred was the President of this society as well as APGO. Fred had a strong interest in research starting in residency. His first paper was about preeclampsia and though he authored over 240 papers in peer review journals, his primary interest remained hypertensive diseases in pregnancy. Fred and his team in Georgia established the current first line therapy in preeclampsia and eclampsia, intravenous magnesium sulfate. Fred also did pioneering work on the role of epinephrine and norepinephrine in hypertensive diseases during pregnancy. Fred met his wife, Jane Cox, at Ohio State. They were married during World War Two and had three children Mark, Kathy and Bethany. Mark is probably responsible for one of Fred’s primary avocations, golf. There are few people I know who enjoyed golf more than Fred and all those who played the game with him enjoyed it also. The specialty has lost one of its greats and I personally have lost a best friend of 60 years.

Submitted by Dr. Edward J. Quilligan

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